The Self in the Story: the Itinera Podcast

Homer, Odyssey 15.389–484

Then the swineherd, marshal of men, responded:

“Friend, since you have asked me and inquired truly of these things,
Listen now in silence and take some pleasure and drink your wine
While you sit there. These nights are endless. There is time for sleep
And there is time to take pleasure in listening. It is not at all necessary
For you to sleep before it is time. Even a lot of sleep can be a burden.
Let whoever of the rest the heart and spirit moves
Go out and sleep. For as soon as the down shows itself
Let him eat and follow the master’s swine.
As we two drink and dine in this shelter
Let us take pleasure as we recall one another’s terrible pains.
For a man finds pleasure even in pains later on
After he has suffered so very many and survived many too.
I will tell you this because you asked me and inquired.”

τὸν δ’ αὖτε προσέειπε συβώτης, ὄρχαμος ἀνδρῶν·
“ξεῖν’, ἐπεὶ ἂρ δὴ ταῦτά μ’ ἀνείρεαι ἠδὲ μεταλλᾷς,
σιγῇ νῦν ξυνίει καὶ τέρπεο πῖνέ τε οἶνον,
ἥμενος. αἵδε δὲ νύκτες ἀθέσφατοι· ἔστι μὲν εὕδειν,
ἔστι δὲ τερπομένοισιν ἀκουέμεν· οὐδέ τί σε χρή,
πρὶν ὥρη, καταλέχθαι· ἀνίη καὶ πολὺς ὕπνος.
τῶν δ’ ἄλλων ὅτινα κραδίη καὶ θυμὸς ἀνώγει,
εὑδέτω ἐξελθών· ἅμα δ’ ἠόϊ φαινομένηφι
δειπνήσας ἅμ’ ὕεσσιν ἀνακτορίῃσιν ἑπέσθω.
νῶϊ δ’ ἐνὶ κλισίῃ πίνοντέ τε δαινυμένω τε
κήδεσιν ἀλλήλων τερπώμεθα λευγαλέοισι
μνωομένω· μετὰ γάρ τε καὶ ἄλγεσι τέρπεται ἀνήρ,
ὅς τις δὴ μάλα πολλὰ πάθῃ καὶ πόλλ’ ἐπαληθῇ.
τοῦτο δέ τοι ἐρέω, ὅ μ’ ἀνείρεαι ἠδὲ μεταλλᾷς.

Today Scott Lepisto (@ScottLepisto and see his website) has released the second podcast to complete  our two-part conversation we had for the second season of the Itinera Podcast. If you listen to it, you will hear, for better or worse, me in all my chaotic, stream-of-consciousness, and, sometimes profane, rambling. There are echoes of stories I have told before when I have written about parenting and teaching,  studying classics and struggling with identity,  or problems with pedantry in our field. But these versions are easier and funnier. And that’s because they’re part of a conversation.

Scott deserves a lot of credit for what he is doing with this series because he brings such a soft touch to his interviews–but he does seem to have just a native knack of getting people to tell stories and share themselves with the world. Stories communicate who we are to each other and reciting them confirms and performs our identities.

The Itinera podcast is helping to create a community in Classics by allowing people to share their stories with wider audiences. Scott’s interviews from both seasons have such moments of sweetness and power that it seems we were living lives of deprivation (and desperation) before he started recording them.

So, listen to the podcast. I don’t think we actually ever get to talking about why this website exists or how it is related to the conversations we have, but we do talk a lot about the lives lived in, through, and by stories.

Menander (fr. 591 K.).

“The man who is sick in the body needs a doctor;
someone who is sick in the mind needs a friend
For a well-meaning friend knows how to treat grief.”

Τῷ μὲν τὸ σῶμα † διατεθειμένῳ κακῶς
χρεία ‘στ’ ἰατροῦ, τῷ δὲ τὴν ψυχὴν φίλου·
λύπην γὰρ εὔνους οἶδε θεραπεύειν φίλος.

Attributed to Socrates (in Stobaeus)

“The sick need doctors; the unlucky need encouragement from friends.”

Τοῖς μὲν νοσοῦσιν ἰατρούς, τοῖς δ’ ἀτυχοῦσι φίλους δεῖ παραινεῖν.

In honor of the stories told in the Itinera podcast, here’s a picture of me and my siblings with our great grandmother in 1994. I’m the one with a vaguely punchable face and glorious hair.

1994

2 thoughts on “The Self in the Story: the Itinera Podcast

  1. Erik

    Where is the MEGALIKE button on here? The face is no more punchable than any teen boy’s, but that hair is astounding!

Leave a reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s