How to Persuade the Judge: Quintilian, 3.7.24-5

“In Sparta, literary pursuits will win less honor than they would in Athens, while endurance and bravery will earn more. Some people think it a fine thing to live by plunder, while others are more inclined to consider the law. Frugality might be hateful to the Sybarite, but among the old Romans luxury was the gravest charge which one could level against another. The same difference holds among individuals. A judge will be most favorably inclined to someone with whom he thinks he agrees.”

Minus Lacedaemone studia litterarum quam Athenis honoris merebuntur, plus patientia ac fortitudo. Rapto vivere quibusdam honestum, aliis cura legum. Frugalitas apud Sybaritas forsitan odio foret, veteribus Romanis summum luxuria crimen. Eadem in singulis differentia. Maxime favet iudex qui sibi dicentem adsentari putat.

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