Take Care of Yourself, For Me!

Cicero, Lettters 16.14

Tully Greets Tiro,

Andricus got here a day later than I was anticipating so I had a night full of fear and worry. I am not even a little bit clearer from your letters about how you’re doing, but I am still relieved. I have no bit of pleasure, nothing to read I can really touch before I see you.

Command that the doctor receive however much he demands! I have written as much to Ummius. I gather that your mind is exhausted and that this is why you’re sick. If you care anything about me, resurrect your love of literature and the life of the mind that makes me love you. You need a strong mind to help your body heal and I beg you to get it back as much as for me as for you. Keep Acastus there to look after you. Save yourself for me! The day of my promise is almost here. If you come, I will be there in person.

Again, and again, take care of yourself.

TULLIUS TIRONI S.

Andricus postridie ad me venit quam exspectaram; itaque habui noctem plenam timoris ac miseriae. tuis litteris nihilo sum factus certior quo modo te haberes, sed tamen sum recreatus. ego omni delectatione litterisque omnibus careo, quas ante quam te videro attingere non possum.

Medico mercedis quantum poscet promitti iubeto. id scripsi ad Ummium. audio te animo angi et medicum dicere ex eo te laborare. si me diligis, excita ex somno tuas litteras humanitatemque, propter quam mihi es carissimus. nunc opus est te animo valere ut corpore possis. id cum tua tum mea causa facias a te peto. Acastum retine, quo commodius tibi ministretur. conserva te mihi. dies promissorum adest, quem1 etiam repraesentabo si adveneris.

Etiam atque etiam vale.

Patience, a Great Part of Justice

Pliny, Letters 6.2 to Maturus Arrianus

“Surely, when ever I am judging a case—a thing which I do more frequently than I speak in one—I grant however much time anyone requests. For I think it rather intemperate to prophesy how much space an unheard case requires and to declare an end to business of an unknown kind especially when a judge owes patience first to his his sacred duty.  This is a great part of justice.

Ok, that’s enough and these things which have been said are not necessary to say. Nevertheless, you aren’t able to figure out what is superfluous unless you hear it.”

Equidem quotiens iudico, quod vel saepius facio quam dico, quantum quis plurimum postulat aquae do. Etenim temerarium existimo divinare quam spatiosa sit causa inaudita, tempusque negotio finire cuius modum ignores, praesertim cum primam religioni suae iudex patientiam debeat, quae pars magna iustitiae est. At quaedam supervacua dicuntur. Etiam: sed satius est et haec dici quam non dici necessaria. Praeterea, an sint supervacua, nisi cum audieris scire non possis.

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