The World is Crazy: Let’s Write Limericks on Byzantine Scholars

A few years back, we made some limericks (with bad rhymes contingent on odd pronunciations) based on Byzantine scholars and historical figures. Yesterday I brought them back. Here are some of ours and others’

The eminent John Tzetzes
must have had remarkable testes.
That he weighs all the same
myriad dubious claims
attests to a nice pair of hefties.

The poet and teacher Psellos
Had a lot he wanted to tell us
So he dressed up the words
Of medicine in verse
But his collections no longer compel us.

I am in love with the myriad words of the Suda
It has something for every kind of mood, uh
When I don’t know a name
Or I think some text is too tame
I use this odd fortress as shield and my tutor

Because I am a part-adolescent who lives in the internet age, I had to tweet about it.

I thought this might be the end, but, mirabile dictu, a twitter friend joined in:

…rounding it out with: “that his ‘sore’-name should so entertain us”.

In my own maturity, I could not help but continue (with a little rhyming help from my friend):

The Byzantine Bishop Eustathius
lived some time after the cretaceous.
He wrote on both Homer’s poems
but never left home
and as a result his rump was curvaceous.

Any one else want to play?

[and many do answer the call….]

The call was answered first 10 minutes after the post went live by salamanderheart:

There once was a girl Theodora,
Who had what all guys wanted more of.
But she let them all down
When she picked up a crown,
And erased what she had been before, uh.

“I am not yet drunk enough to write poetry.”–Li Po

And our own Palaiophron added:

Triclinius’ knowledge was ‘extensive’,
Yet on one point he got quite defensive:
He had a small peter,
So he wrote about meters,
Where his measure was quite comprehensive.

And I awoke with this:

Boethius was a man of some polish
of high breeding, with no lack of knowledge.
Emperor Theodoric threw him in jail
–Thanks to a treasonous tale–
There he made philosophy his solace.

And revived nearly 3 years later by no less an eminence than Tzetzes himself:

If only all debates were pursued through limerick….

Image result for byzantine art isidore

Isidore of Seville

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