Category Archives: Greek

Democritus, fr.61 [Stob. III 37, 25].

Democritus, that old laughing-philosopher, has some advice for all of us returning to work and school:     “Whoever has orderly ways also has an ordered life.”   οἷσιν ὁ τρόπος ἐστὶν εὔτακτος, τούτοισι καὶ ὁ βίος συντέτακται

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Work-Contests: Two Passages from the Odyssey about Manual Labor

A repeated motif in the Odyssey is Odysseus’ ability to do manual labor, often marked out in contrast with the suitors who just lay about consuming another man’s wealth.  While it is clear that this is not a revolutionary embrace … Continue reading

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“Sweat is The Price of Virtue”: Some Greek Quotes for Labor Day

Plutarch, Perikles 1.4 5-6   “Often and quite contrarily, we look down on a laborer while delighting in his work”   πολλάκις δὲ καὶ τοὐναντίον χαίροντες τῷ ἔργῳ τοῦ δημιουργοῦ καταφρονοῦμεν   Hesiod Works and Days, 289-90     “The gods made … Continue reading

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Flaccan Friday: Quoting Horace

When I was younger, I didn’t have much time for Quintus Horatius Flaccus. (O Fons Bandusiae? Please.) I remember loathing him for his Epistles when studying for the AP in high school, slogging through the Sermones as an undergraduate  and even in graduate … Continue reading

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Euripides on Marriage: Misleading Fragments

Euripides, fr. 137 (Andromeda)   “Best of all riches is to find a noble spouse.”   τῶν γὰρ πλούτων ὅδ’ ἄριστος γενναῖον λέχος εὑρεῖν.   This might be one of the few positive comments about marriage from Classical Greece. But, … Continue reading

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Returning to the Classroom after Leave: Some Ancient Reminders

Is teaching like riding a bicycle? Let’s see what the ancients say…   Pindar, Olympian 8.59-60 Posted on July 9, 2012 by sententiaeantiquae   “Teaching is easier for someone who knows; not learning first is stupid. “     τὸ … Continue reading

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Euripides, fr. 910: A Lost Ode on the Virtue of an Inquiring Mind

“Happy is he who has learned from inquiry Not because he searches for pain for his countrymen Nor some other unjust deeds But because he seeks out the ageless order of immortal nature—where it came together, where it came from … Continue reading

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